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Friday Job Market

Looking to hire a smart, qualified person for a position in transportation planning, engineering, IT, or advocacy? Post a listing on the Streetsblog Jobs Board and reach our national audience of dedicated readers.

Looking for a job? Here are the current listings:

Associate Transportation Planner, Seattle Department of Transportation, Seattle, Washington
The Project Development Division of the Seattle Department of Transportation presents an exceptional opportunity working with a team of professionals focused on creating a safe, interconnected, vibrant, affordable, and innovative city for all. Reporting to the Project Development Team Lead, the Associate Transportation Planner will support a multi-discipline, multi-section, and multi-agency team of initiation, execution, and completion of complex, highly visible projects and programs.

Bureau Chief — Transportation, Traffic and Parking, City of Stamford, Connecticut
The City of Stamford is seeking a highly motivated and experienced professional to manage and direct all matters pertaining to the traffic functions of the City, in accordance with the City Charter. The Bureau Chief will be the head of the Transportation, Traffic & Parking Bureau and shall be responsible for the analysis, planning, execution and administration of plans and programs for the City’s transportation functions.

Development Assistant, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, San Francisco, California
The Development Associate reports to the Development Director and works closely with a team of staff, board members, interns and volunteers. The Development Associate helps plan and executes contributed revenue strategy in areas key to ensuring organizational sustainability. Areas of responsibility include: individual donor cultivation and stewardship, direct mail and electronic fundraising campaign support, foundation prospecting and grant writing, business partner support, workplace giving and third-party fundraising support.

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5 Highlights From Last Night’s Bike-Share vs. Parking Meeting

A dense network of stations is what makes bike-share work so well in these Brooklyn neighborhoods.

Last night’s Brooklyn Community Board 6 bike-share forum lacked the fireworks of previous meetings — no physical threats this time. While the tone was civil, the demands from the anti-bike-share crowd weren’t exactly reasonable.

So far, Citi Bike has proven incredibly popular in CB 6, with some stations getting as much as seven rides per dock each day. That’s a lot more activity than the average free car parking spot ever sees.

Opponents said they would be fine with the bike-share stations if they didn’t occupy curb space that previously served as free car storage. They suggested the docks be moved onto sidewalks and that the station density be cut in half. But sidewalks in Park Slope and Carroll Gardens don’t have room for bike-share stations, and reducing station density would ruin the usefulness of the bike-share system. Bike-share only works well when you don’t have to walk more than a couple of minutes to reach a station.

With the room at capacity, Council Member Brad Lander live streamed the meeting for people stuck outside. The entire one-hour, 45-minute video (which amazingly does not capture the entire meeting) is available on Lander’s Facebook page. Here are the highlights:

Read more…

Streetsblog USA
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London Is Going to Ban the Deadliest Trucks From Its Streets

Photo: Transport for London via Treehugger

Image: Transport for London via Treehugger

Heavy trucks with big blind spots are a deadly menace to cyclists and pedestrians.

In Boston, eight of the nine cyclist fatalities between 2012 and 2014 involved commercial vehicles, according to the Boston Cyclists Union [PDF].

Between June and September this year, there were six cyclist fatalities in Chicago, and all six involved heavy trucks.

In New York City, drivers of heavy trucks account for 32 percent of bike fatalities and 12 percent of pedestrian fatalities, despite the fact that they are only 3.6 percent of traffic.

U.S. cities are starting to take steps like requiring sideguards on some trucks. But no American city is tackling the problem like London is.

In London, city officials estimate that 58 percent of cyclist deaths and more than a quarter of pedestrian deaths involve heavy trucks, even though trucks only account for 4 percent of traffic. Evidence suggests trucks pose an especially large risk to women cyclists.

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Tesla’s Vision for the Future of Autonomous Cars Should Scare Us

What impact will self-driving cars have on cities?

Will self-driving cars be part of shared fleets or have the old individual ownership model? The answer will be important to the health of cities. Photo: Flickr/David van der Mark

Will self-driving cars also bring about shared fleets or will they operate in the old individual ownership model? Photo: Flickr/David van der Mark

The range of potential outcomes is enormous. In the best-case scenario, private car ownership gives way to shared fleets of autonomous cars, freeing up vast amounts of land that used to be devoted to vehicle storage.

Then there’s the scenario promoted by Tesla, in which everyone owns their personal autonomous vehicle. The consequences would be frightening, says Yonah Freemark at the Transport Politic:

Robin Chase, the founder of Zipcar, has laid out an intuitive way of understanding this issue using a binary “heaven or hell” construction (note: I’ve interviewed her in the past on how autonomous cars will impact the transit system). According to this formulation, we could have “heaven” if we had fleets of shared, electric, driverless cars powered by renewable energy, plus a redistributive economy that ensures that people who once had jobs in the transportation sector have access to a minimum income. On the other hand, we could have “hell” if everyone owns his or her own driverless car that does our errands, parks our cars, and circles the neighborhood waiting for us to need it again.

Tesla seems to be resolving this issue for us.

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Today’s Headlines

  • Second Witness Implicates Cuomo in Bridgegate Testimony (PoliticoWSJ)
  • DiNapoli Says the MTA Has More Cash on Hand Than Expected for 2019 (Crain’s)
  • Families for Safe Streets Launches Safe Driver Pledge Site in Memory of Allison Liao (Gothamist)
  • Voice: Women Need Safe Streets to Ride Bikes, Not Marketing Campaigns
  • NYC Paid Willets Point Garages to Build a Bronx “Auto Mall.” It Didn’t Work Out (NY1)
  • Want a Copy of That Integrated NYC Bus and Subway Map? Now’s Your Chance (DNA)
  • DOT Will Paint Bike Lanes on Grand Avenue in Maspeth (QNS)
  • Jeffrey Dinowitz and Locals Call for Improvements at Intersection Near Riverdale School (Press)
  • Despite High-Profile Crashes, Transit Remains Exponentially Safer Than Driving (MTR)
  • People Who Take Traffic Violence Seriously, People Who Don’t (News)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA


A Verrazano Bike/Ped Path Doesn’t Have to Cost as Much as the MTA Claims


A Verrazano bike path would work perfectly well without this hulking ramp connecting to the Shore Parkway Greenway. Image via MTA/Parsons Brinckerhoff

How much will it cost to build bicycle and pedestrian paths on the Verrazano Bridge? A lot less than the MTA says it will, if the agency removes unnecessary ramps from the project, according to advocates and engineers who’ve reviewed the options.

Last year, the MTA and engineering firm Parsons Brinckerhoff released a preliminary cost estimate of $300 to $400 million for the bridge paths [PDF]. It was a steeper price than advocates with the Harbor Ring Committee, which has built momentum for the car-free paths, had been expecting. Back in 1997, engineering firm Amman & Whitney had pegged the cost at $50-60 million (in 2016 dollars).

In an interview published yesterday on Urban Omnibus, Harbor Ring Committee chair Paul Gertner attributed the MTA’s high pricetag to the design for the Brooklyn approach, which includes elaborate ramps connecting to the Shore Parkway Greenway. It’s not clear how much the ramp system adds to the MTA’s cost estimate, but the structures would be substantial, with concrete columns supporting a winding bikeway that touches down on the greenway.

“As far as we can tell, [Parsons Brinckerhoff] started with the assumption that it had to start at the waterfront greenway, and then proceeded to design this huge ramp system,” Gertner said.

A greenway landing isn’t worth the extra cost, Gertner told Streetsblog, since it would compel anyone who’s not planning to use the greenway to take a long detour. In the Amman & Whitney plan, the path touched down at 92nd Street by Fourth Avenue, a much more direct connection to the street network.

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Driver Who Killed 3 People on Bronx Sidewalk Charged With Manslaughter

Nyanna Aquil, left, her grandfather Louis Perez, and Kristian Leka were killed in the Bronx by a curb-jumping driver last Halloween. Bronx DA Darcel Clark charged Howard Unger with multiple counts of manslaughter, assault, and homicide for the crash.

Nyanna Aquil, left, her grandfather Louis Perez, and Kristian Leka were killed in the Bronx by a curb-jumping driver last Halloween. Bronx DA Darcel Clark charged Howard Unger with multiple counts of manslaughter, assault, and homicide for the crash.

District Attorney Darcel Clark filed manslaughter and homicide charges against a motorist who fatally struck three people, including a child, on a Bronx sidewalk last year.

Howard Unger was indicted this week on three counts of manslaughter, three counts of assault, three counts of homicide, one count of misdemeanor reckless endangerment, and one misdemeanor count of falsifying records, according to court records.

Unger, 53, of the Bronx, hit several vehicles before driving a Dodge sedan over the curb on Morris Park Avenue near Bogart Avenue on the afternoon of October 31, 2015.

Unger crashed into a group of people who were out trick-or-treating, killing 10-year-old Nyanna Aquil; her grandfather, 65-year-old Louis Perez; and Kristian Leka, 24, who pushed others out of Unger’s path.

Aquil’s younger sisters, ages 3 and 8, were injured, as were Leka’s 9-year-old sister and his fiancé, according to the Times and DNAinfo.

Prosecutors say Unger is epileptic and “had not been taking medication as prescribed before the crash,” DNAinfo reported.

Image: WCBS

Image: WCBS

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DOT Compromises 111th Street Redesign to Win Francisco Moya’s Support

DOT's updated 111th Street plan (top) maintains two-way southbound traffic flow and omit the new crosswalks included in the original plan (below). Images: DOT

DOT’s updated 111th Street plan (top) maintains two lanes of southbound car traffic and omits crosswalks included in the original plan (below). Images: DOT

DOT has released a watered-down version of its redesign for 111th Street in Corona. The compromise has won over Assembly Member Francisco Moya, who had withheld his support for the original plan, saying 111th Street needed to retain more car lanes.


Assembly Member Francisco Moya. Photo: NY Assembly

The new design will not be as safe to cross as the original proposal. Instead of one southbound moving lane, the compromise plan calls for two southbound lanes. It does not include four painted crosswalks in the original plan. The new design maintains the two-way protected bike lane along Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Currently, 111th Street has two northbound and three southbound car lanes, leading to high traffic speeds. From 2010 to 2014, 23 pedestrians, 24 cyclists, and 92 motor vehicle occupants were injured on 111th Street, and the main goal of the project is to provide safer access to the park for people walking and biking from nearby neighborhoods. The compromise design will improve on the status quo but won’t be as safe as DOT’s original plan.

Moya staked his opposition on the argument that there’s too much traffic on 111th Street to narrow it, particularly during sporting events at nearby Citi Field and Arthur Ashe Stadium. But a DOT analysis concluded that the street could handle current traffic volumes with only one lane in each direction, and volunteers shot video during last October’s World Series games confirming that there just isn’t much traffic, even during huge events.

Read more…
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Center City Philadelphia Commuters Increasingly Arriving by Bike

Where bicyclists were once a trickle in Philadelphia, they are now a steady stream.

Bike commuting in central Philadelphia is on the rise, according to a recent report by the Center City District, which found about 1,400 cyclists entering the center city from the south during the peak rush hour.

Thousands of cyclists pour into Center City Philadelphia daily, largely on two buffered bike lanes. Graph: Center City District

Thousands of cyclists pour into Center City Philadelphia daily, largely on two buffered bike lanes. Graph: Center City District

Randy LoBasso at the Bike Coalition of Greater Philadelphia explains the increase is happening even though the infrastructure is less than ideal:

In their new report, “Bicycle Commuting,” Center City District reports that cyclists entering Center City on northbound streets during rush hour (8am-9am) “was up 22 percent over the … last count in 2014” and up 79 percent since 2010.

According to CCD’s bike counts, cyclists are using Center City lanes specifically engineered for high bike rates — like Spruce Street and 13th Street, which have wide, buffered bike lanes.

And Center City residents and commuters agree that motor vehicles parking in those bike lanes is especially annoying for Philadelphia road users. A Transportation Priorities Survey, also released by Center City District, found that the most important issues hindering mobility are vehicles blocking lanes, lack of enforcement and poor street conditions.

Cyclists are well aware of the problem of people in motor vehicles thinking they can pull over into a bike lane without fear of being ticketed, and without care for the other road users who can get injured when they do so.

Read more…


Today’s Headlines

  • Revised DOT Plan for 111th Street Keeps a Car Lane and Drops Crosswalks (DNA)
  • Doored Cyclist Run Over by MTA Bus Driver in Williamsburg, in Critical Condition (DNANews)
  • StreetsPAC Petition Calls on NYPD to Update the Public on Matthew von Ohlen Investigation
  • Nassau County Exec Ed Mangano Expected to Be Charged in Corruption Probe (WSJPost)
  • Christie Will Appear in Court to Answer Bridgegate Summons (Post)
  • De Blasio’s MTA Board Appointees Make News by Not Sitting on Their Hands (WSJ)
  • Bronx Motorist Who Killed Three People Last Halloween Indicted for Homicide (DNA)
  • Someone Died After DOT Changed an UES Intersection to Accommodate One Motorist (DNA)
  • NYPD Issuing Criminal Summonses for Crossing Tracks Where LIRR Removed Ped Bridge (TL)
  • Advance Looks at History of Attempts to Bring the Subway to Staten Island

More headlines at Streetsblog USA