Skip to content

Recent Comments

  1.  

    Andrew

    Most New York City residents don’t own cars. Most New York City visitors don’t arrive by car. Why are you so unwilling to accept that others may make different choices than you?

  2.  

    Andrew

    I’m curious, how do you propose that they get around safely? You’ve already made it quite clear that pedestrian safety is unimportant to you.

  3.  

    Vooch

    This Is clearly a Interim solution intended to be installed by end of summer.

    BTW – The CB Board included language Asking DOT to Support/study a PBL for Fifth from 23rd to 8th.

  4.  

    Andrew

    You are not your car.

    For most of us, I agree, but we may have found an exception.

  5.  

    Andrew

    And they’re welcome to shop elsewhere if they prefer. (They probably do already.)

  6.  

    Andrew

    Actually, pedestrians and cyclists and transit riders have choices and most certainly respond to the environment that are presented with. Pedestrians patronize businesses in areas that are safe and pleasant for pedestrians and stay away from areas that aren’t.

    If your sole objective in designing streets is to maximize speed of motor vehicles, the result won’t be attractive or safe or pleasant for pedestrians, and pedestrians will go elsewhere. It might not be attractive or safe or pleasant for motorists, either – the parts of the city that we’re discussing don’t exactly have a lot of space available for parking.

  7.  

    Andrew

    Proof by assertion.

  8.  

    madman10101

    What about people who are riding from 4th Avenue and continuing up on Park Avenue? With this plan it would require one to cross into the bike lane at E15th street and then cross back onto the north-bound side of Park Avenue two blocks later at East 17th street. Everyone remembers the § 4-12 (p) of the NYC Traffic rules “Bicycle riders must use bike path/lane, if provided, except for access, safety, turns, etc.” – so a bicyclist legally MUST do this. It could work if they made at least a shared bike lane on the northbound portion of Park Avenue….

  9.  

    rogue

    This is awesome. A true protected path with bollards.

  10.  

    redbike

    South of 16th St on Onion Sq East, the current southbound-only bike lane is always obstructed by parked police vehicles. Any plans to eliminate this obstacle?

    Any discussion of — south of 14th St — making the 4th Av / Lafayette St protected bike lane two-way — as it should be? The only chokepoint is the curb at the NW corner of the intersection at E 8th St. Currently, biking southbound on B’way is typically marginal at best.

  11.  

    BrandonWC

    I’m assuming Wright is DOT’s Ted Wright?

  12.  

    Komanoff

    The figures in this post are cyclists traveling in both directions, yes?

  13.  

    James Donohue

    I suggest every cyclist be equipped with a helmet mounted video camera, with or w/o Bike Lanes, and we will see that 99% of the motorists are fine, it’s the other one percent who cause all the aggravation and mishaps. “Instant Replay” hit our TV screens in 1974 for baseball, IIRC. Just a wake-up call, we now have Instant Replay for everyday bicycling…

  14.  

    J

    Wow, DOT is actually thinking about networks. Hooray!

    Maybe someday we will have a real bicycle plan to create a network of these low-stress facilities across the city. Maybe someday DOT will actually create useable crosstown bike facilities. Maybe DOT will actually TRY to get funding to implement these quicker.

  15.  

    Alicia

    All the NYC businesses that get some revenue from customers arriving by car should be asked.

    Which is a way of saying you don’t have an actual answer to my question.

    It is not worth my time to google for the $2 scenario.

    It took you longer to type those four comments you just responded to me (on the threads you wanted to ‘stop’) than it would have to google.

  16.  

    J

    Yep, DOT is talking out of both sides of the mouth. Clearly this refusal of funding was De Blasio’s call. Maybe there is a good reason to prioritize limited funding for other things, but since more people will be injured and killed as a result, you need to actually make that argument instead of some bullshit “we don’t need the money” reason. How am I supposed to support DOT on good projects like this, when they treat me like I’m an idiot?

  17.  

    jcwconsult

    There is a current bill in MI to have 75+ year old drivers renew licenses in person every 4 years instead of every 8. I have not decided what I think about it.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  18.  

    jcwconsult

    All the NYC businesses that get some revenue from customers arriving by car should be asked.

    It is not worth my time to google for the $2 scenario.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  19.  

    Simon Phearson

    Ah, sounds like Wright didn’t get the memo – according to his boss, Trottenberg, the DOT has all the resources it could possibly ask for.

  20.  

    jcwconsult

    The voters did not agree to a high enough millage to subsidize overnight bus service.
    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  21.  

    jcwconsult

    You might want to ask the businesses in NYC if they would voluntarily give up the revenue from customers that arrive by car. The answers will mostly be no.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  22.  

    Alicia

    Considering how rapidly health can decline at that age, why shouldn’t they get exams to ensure their eyesight (and reflexes, and other relevant aspects of health) are good enough to drive?

  23.  

    Maggie

    I knew 33,000 people died from car crashes in an average year in the U.S., but I didn’t know it had recently spiked to 38,000, and just learned from reading Door to Door that the odds for an American to die in a car crash are 1 in 113.

    http://www.nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/injury-facts-chart.aspx

  24.  

    AnoNYC

    Clinton St/Ave B or Essex St/Ave A.

  25.  

    BrandonWC

    It should make it easier to prove, in a civil suit, that the driver was negligent.

  26.  

    jcwconsult

    Because history shows it doesn’t work very well.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  27.  

    jcwconsult

    No. James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  28.  

    Elizabeth F

    Wow… $200 for killing a pedestrian in a crosswalk with a 2-ton hunk of steel, but $1000 for riding a bicycle with a 1/3HP electric motor.

    http://insideevs.com/riders-of-electric-bikes-hit-with-1000-fine-in-new-york-city/

  29.  

    Alicia

    And if NYC thought that their local economy depended on making car drivers from Michigan and Idaho happy, they would bend over backwards to cater to them. But if they don’t, then the economic realities probably indicate that they don’t depend on cars as much as you want to believe.

  30.  

    jcwconsult

    Fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled:
    1940 10.9 Today 1.1 QED

    You might want to ask the tourist businesses if they want to give up whatever portion of their revenue that comes from people who arrive by car. I can assure you the answer from almost all of them will be no.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  31.  

    Alicia

    You might want to ask the businesses that get some significant
    revenue from those that arrive by car if they want to give up most of
    those paying customers. Their answers are likely to be no.

    Which NYC businesses are you thinking of?

    Many years ago, residents in some city wanted to get rid of a
    business they thought was detrimental to their community. The business
    paid their employees a couple of times with $2 bills

    Residents in “some city” (but you can’t remember which) wanted to get rid of “a business” (but you can’t remember which). How specific.

    Do even know where you heard this story, so that I can attempt to fact check it?

  32.  

    reasonableexplanation

    The folks in your polling place don’t count your votes, you know that, right?

  33.  

    jcwconsult

    You might want to ask the businesses that get some significant revenue from those that arrive by car if they want to give up most of those paying customers. Their answers are likely to be no.

    Many years ago, residents in some city wanted to get rid of a business they thought was detrimental to their community. The business paid their employees a couple of times with $2 bills and the economic value of the business to the community was so obvious that the attitude of the residents changed entirely.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  34.  

    Alicia

    so I will stop on this thread.

    You changed your mind rather quickly. I suppose you are just eager to get the last word in, and that trumps your wish to “stop”.

    and users would definitely not pay the real costs in fares.

    Which is true of a lot of public services. Parks don’t charge admission. Libraries provide most of their services for no fees. Public schools don’t charge tuition. Police and firefighters don’t charge people to respond to emergency calls. So, I am not sure why you think that’s an issue, unless you believe on principle that all public services should be paid for by specific user fees and not general taxes.

  35.  

    Philip Neumann

    Which is how and why DK Centraal got this rack. Queens Comfort or Queens Kickshaw in Astoria had requested a similar arrangement a few years back, and they got shot down for the exact same bullshit reasons from the CB and competing business interests who think cars= people= $$, but bikes= toys= waste. It drives me nuts

  36.  

    com63

    It’s amazing that this type of thing is such a victory for streets safety compared to the status quo, but at the same time is really just a tiny slap on the wrist. A $200 fine for killing someone.

    I wonder if a conviction under this law gives the victim’s family more of an ability to collect civil penalties.

  37.  

    jcwconsult

    If Megabus/Indian Trails believed they could get enough fares to make such a service profitable, they would likely offer it. Economic realities are important.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  38.  

    jcwconsult

    The city is building more bike lanes, though they are lightly used away from campus. Some must be entered and left like ET did in the movie, because they start and stop in the middle of long segments of main road.

    So far, voters have not agreed to subsidize overnight bus services that would be used by few people – and users would definitely not pay the real costs in fares.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  39.  

    Philip Neumann

    But none of the bridges connect to 14th Street directly, so really we’d need more dedicated space/streets from 14th Street down to the Williamsburg Bridge for this plan to really make a dent in the catastrophic nightmare that will become public transit for anyone who has relied on the L train.

  40.  

    Vooch

    reallocate 4 of 6 motor lanes to buses on WB bridge

  41.  

    Vooch

    but you agree that yearly full blown exams should be required for anyone over 70 ?

  42.  

    Vooch

    dude like I’m totally An-Cap also; so why aren’t you arguing to privatize at least the interstates

  43.  

    Vooch

    the same people counting votes ?

    LOL

  44.  

    fdtutf

    The 85th percentile speed on rural Missouri highways in 1940 was 62.5 mph. Today in midwestern states, similar rural highways have 85th speeds of 65 to 70 — essentially no change given the difference in safety driving a modern car versus one from the late 1930s.

    Safety for which road users?

    People from 25+ miles away simply won’t come if you make it too difficult, expensive, or hassled. They will take their discretionary dollars elsewhere and your local businesses will NOT like the losses.

    Yes, if there’s one thing I notice in New York, it’s that there just are not enough darn tourists. If only we could figure out how to attract more of them before our economy completely collapses!

  45.  

    Danny G

    Just put a traffic light on the FDR at 14th Street, and tear down Con Ed’s fence at Avenue C.

    Not sure where you’d hook it up in Williamsburg, or how pontoon bridges open up to allow ships through.

  46.  

    reasonableexplanation

    I can’t comment to the bike counting, but in terms of vehicle counting you’re likely wrong.

    The way cars are counted in NYC is usually via a 3rd party contractor, where they literally hire the same people you see working in your polling place on election day, give them clicky counters, and set them loose on streets/intersections.

    They set it up so several people are counting the same cars. If their numbers are close, the data is averaged, if not, either the outlier is thrown out or the location gets recounted another day.

    On the whole, this process is less prone to error than your casual observations.

  47.  

    Simon Phearson

    Yeah, you won’t get that, that’s for sure. I’m not sure they even gave much thought to where the bike/pedestrian path would come down Queens-side, given that the car traffic empties onto the LIE. From the drawings it looks like it’d have to somehow link up with the Pulaski bridge path or down into Jackson or Borden – neither of them great streets for biking (Borden especially).

    It’d be intriguing to have another way to bike into Manhattan from Queens/Northern Brooklyn between Delancey and 59th – the less up/downtown biking you have to do in Manhattan, the better – but the fact that you’d have to take an elevator to/from the path makes this almost a total non-starter for regular commuting. Just about the only way I would use this bridge is to bike for exercise.

  48.  

    jcwconsult

    NHTSA data shows about 1.1 fatality per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (includes people in cars, on bikes, and peds). NHTSA data shows about 1 pedestrian fatality per 70 million miles walked. There simply is no massive crisis in traffic safety today.

    James C. Walker, Life Member – National Motorists Association

  49.  

    Jonathan R

    Too bad the FDR blocks any kind of pontoon-bridge solution.

  50.  

    Alicia

    Fortunately for New York, there are millions that are happy to take planes, trains, or buses there that they don’t depend all that much on private car ownership.