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  1.  

    qrt145

    I don’t get why newspaper editors feel the need to use silly cycling metaphors every time they write on anything related to bikes. Even the NYT: “well-loved-but-wobbly bicycle-sharing program, which has been pedaling toward oblivion”.

    Do they do that with every topic and I just don’t notice?

    At least I give the Times credit for not confusing peddling with pedaling…

  2.  

    Joe R.

    Put a hot dog cart or something similar in the space. Or perhaps a donut vendor. That might go over enough with the cops that they wouldn’t care.

  3.  

    Cassandra Dunn

    eek, I’ve always wanted to travel to France, but it’s much less enticing now. I finally got in touch with NBC 4 News and unlike every other news station, they actually cared and reported my story!
    http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Gore-Blood-Traffic-Pole-Accident-Lexington-33rd-Midtown-Manhattan-Remains-Cleanup-280803122.html

  4.  

    Cassandra Dunn

    NBC4 New York was the only news station that cared about this issue and reported it tonight. They told me that they’re on it and are going to find a way to get this cleaned up. I’m so thankful for them, they actually care about the people in this city! http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Gore-Blood-Traffic-Pole-Accident-Lexington-33rd-Midtown-Manhattan-Remains-Cleanup-280803122.html

  5.  

    lop

    Signs often do say otherwise, and even when they don’t enforcement is nonexistent.

  6.  

    LuisD

    What would happen if a group of pedestrians decided to gather one morning and just stand on the sidewalk, engaging in small talk?

    Two people sharing a conversation here, another guy standing reading the newspaper there. All of them standing legally on the sidewalk, but blocking these fake parking spots. Would the drivers get out of their cars and demand that the pedestrians move, especially when the pedestrians are using the space legally and for its intended purpose? If drivers got out of their cars and confronted the pedestrians, it could be filmed and I bet it would go viral in no time. This would put tremendous social and political pressure to stop this shameful practice.

  7.  

    Jeb

    The idea is you’re using it for short trips, not to “pleasure ride.” If there wasn’t frequent redocking, bikes would be even less available than they are.

  8.  

    Joe R.

    Besides that, cops can do what a lot of other people do when they start in jobs which don’t pay all that well in the beginning-stay with parents or relatives. Nothing says you have to on your own the minute you start working. If you live with other people, NYC can be quite affordable. In fact, it’s not a horrible idea to live with other people, then bank most of your pay, so you can eventually buy a house or condo with cash. If you own instead of rent, NYC isn’t inexpensive. My mom owns her house outright. The home related bills for taxes, water, electricity, and heating are under $1000 a month.

  9.  

    Cold Shoaler

    Presuming it’s functional and timely. I won’t be renewing at either the current rate (if it’s even still available) or the new 50% higher one until there’s a dock near my phase II(b) home AND the rest of the service area is more reliable and denser. If expansion doesn’t go a whole lot better than launch, this thing is gonna get ripped out. Secure bike parking, mo’ better bike lanes, improved retail bike rental, etc. may ultimately be a better fit for this city. I love the idea of bike share, but with PPP+NYC it may just not work here.

  10.  

    Sean Kelliher

    As an addition to #4 – the practice of issuing and honoring of parking placards that let federal, state, and city employees, their friends and allies, and a host of other people park their personal cars absolutely anywhere for free.

    Also, the setting aside of curb space as reserved parking for the personal cars of police, fire, related law enforcement, EMTs, letter carriers (I kid you not), media, etc. is another hinderance to better street design.

  11.  

    AnoNYC

    Because $90,000 over 5.5 years before overtime is poverty…

    Cops should be mandated to live in the city they police. If there were any city workers that should be required to live here, these are them. Living in the suburbs leads to a severe disconnect with the communities they patrol. You can easily live in the outer boroughs or upper Manhattan making $90,000. Millions of residents make half of that.

    Police are socialized in NYC to leave the city and move to the suburbs.

  12.  

    AnoNYC

    All precincts should be engineered with multi-level parking garages to store official vehicles. I don’t have any sympathy for their POV’s, in my opinion, police should live where they work, or at least the same city.

  13.  

    JimthePE

    State law already says no parking within 30 feet of the corner or 20 feet of a crosswalk, unless official signs and markings say otherwise.

  14.  

    JimthePE

    Just curious – how does the city clear snow from around these parking lane bike parking racks?

  15.  

    Kevin Love

    So… We have photos that show a judge lied in court to try to weasel his way out of a ticket. Consequences for a judge who lies to a court are?

    Oh right. He’s a car driver. That makes being a judge and lying in court OK.

  16.  

    Joe R.

    A lot of things come to mind:

    1) Community boards comprised of people who grew up in the “See the USA-in your Chevrolet!” era who think bikes are something for people 12 years old or younger, not serious transportation for adults.

    2) Elected leaders who are either from the same era, or are just afraid of the clout of the motoring minority.

    3) A minority of 1%ers who feel entitled by their wealth to drive everywhere. This colors policy enough so that we cater to cars in general. That in turn results in more of the middle class driving who otherwise wouldn’t.

    4) Residents who view free on-street parking as a virtual entitlement.

    5) Businesspeople who still think the majority of their customers come by car (maybe true if your business deals in heavy items but in general not true).

    6) Bribes and kickbacks from industries which benefit from the current policy. Some industries which come to mind are taxis, for-hire car services, traffic light manufacturers, road repair businesses, etc.

    7) Institutional neglect of infrastructure. This is partly related to 6). For example, roads are “repaired” or repaved to very low standards so the companies can get paid again doing the same work over and over again. Nobody holds these companies accountable, nor refuses to pay them if their work isn’t up to par.

    Anyone else feel free to add to this list. This is just what came to mind in short order.

  17.  

    Ian Turner

    Your risk of a head injury while walking down the sidewalk is actually the same on a per-mile basis (and more on a per-hour basis) compared to cycling. So maybe you should wear that helmet, if you think cycling is so dangerous.

  18.  

    DrS

    Is there a way we can just put this driver’s name and address up publicly and encourage vigilante justice?
    If the “justice” system thinks that it can not punish people for violence, somebody else will have to do it.

  19.  

    lop

    That lowers bridge costs less than 1%. Is that so appealing? Or is the point that it makes it easier to avoid admitting the full cost of the project? He can say they can’t know that if the loan gets rolled over at a different unknown interest rate in a few years.

  20.  

    Nicholas Littlejohn

    Way safer and more calming in Portland and SF. Come on, nyc!

  21.  

    Nicholas Littlejohn

    Turn them in!

  22.  

    jooltman

    Time to stop blaming victims: Victim “error” accounts for under a quarter of all fatal crashes.

  23.  

    Nicholas Littlejohn

    What is going wrong here in NYC? All of this is done and very obvious in SF.. I hope you can vote in better leaders or bribe the current ones.

  24.  

    Nicholas Littlejohn

    It seems very little is being done in NYC in general on the logical, progressive front.

    I’m visiting from SF where it’s far better. Any local insight as to what’s going wrong here?

  25.  

    anon

    What about the UES? I’d love to ride 28 blocks in the morning from home to work. Instead, I am crammed onto the train for three stops which takes longer than a bike ride for the same distance.

  26.  

    ReinventAlbany

    Thank you for providing a csv format download of the DMV crash data. Be great to see public interest groups and journalists routinely share their data in an open format like this.

  27.  

    vnm

    Wait, can this be right? According to the politicians on the TV news, it’s Metro North that’s unsafe, not cars!

  28.  

    lop

    Or consider a premium membership with 60 minute rides before overages.

  29.  

    Nicole Gelinas

    London allows people to use their keyfob to buy daily and weekly passes, and they have an autorenew option so that they next time you need one, it gives you whatever time period you got the last time without your having to go online and reconfigure it.

  30.  

    Nicole Gelinas

    This time limit will be a bigger issue as the system expands to Astoria, etc. It will be harder to get to all points within 45 minutes. I think they should give members a few “grace” overages before overtime starts to kick in.

  31.  

    Clarke

    Except Boston’s winter service is increasing this year http://bostinno.streetwise.co/2014/10/28/hubway-2014-winter-service-boston-cambridge/

  32.  

    lop

    Especially if you have other stations nearby add FMCP. Big enough that bikes are very useful for getting around, even if you take a bus, subway, or drive to the park. Parks department documents suggested creating a bike share system for the park before citibike existed.

  33.  

    Jass

    A price hike right before the winter? Terrible move.

  34.  

    Payton Chung

    The key has to be bought online and mailed to you in advance. Some cities have storefronts where you can get keys in person, though.

  35.  

    Danny G

    Have you ever lifted up a CitiBike? They’re heavy, and I don’t think it would be user-friendly to have a vertically staggered arrangement, unless I am misunderstanding your suggestion.

    I find it more convenient to let the stations be somewhat permeable (as they sort of are now – well, not for wheelchairs or strollers, and not if the station is full), so that you can don’t have to walk all the way around the station if you want to get across it.

  36.  

    Ferdinand Cesarano

    Right; as I mentioned, I am aware of the option of re-docking. But that should be a once-in-a-while thing. When every trip will require a re-docking, this is a bit of a counter-incentive to sign up.

    I will repeat that I am a member, and that I intend to renew. So this quibble hasn’t stopped me from paying. But I wouldn’t be surprised if many people concluded that this would be a hassle and never signed up, or didn’t renew after having to re-dock during every trip.

  37.  

    Gil Lopez

    This is nonsense. Is there a way for someone to get in touch with the DAs office and voice concern/outrage about this?

  38.  

    BBnet3000

    In New York we use sharrows where theres “too much auto traffic to change the road geometry” (but actually its the parking we wont touch, not the moving lanes), in The Netherlands the standards require segregated cyclepaths where the auto traffic exceeds a certain threshold.

    These are inverse design choices. Guess which place is talking about Vision Zero and which place has actually accomplished it?

  39.  

    Maggie

    Yeah, they really landed the punch. The communication yesterday seemed pretty clear that people would know in advance *when* prices were going up. Seems a bit like bad-faith dealing here. Strange.

  40.  

    Cold Shoaler

    Sometimes the “gutter” is a “bike lane” here in NYC.

  41.  

    r

    “Neighbors of the precinct (on Bergen) complain consistently about the volume of vehicles parked on the nearby streets, which during the daytime, are typically 100% occupied.”

    That’s the part I’m responding to. Illegal sidewalk parking should be ended immediately by all precincts.

    Officers parking vehicles on the street in legal spots is just part of the free parking game.

  42.  

    Dave

    So if I were to visit DC tomorrow, I’d be able to get a key right away and start riding? I think you’d still have to use the kiosk or sign up online and wait 7 days for a key. Correct me if I’m wrong.

  43.  

    qrt145

    They are parking illegally on the sidewalk.

  44.  

    r

    Well, if officers are parking illegally or on the sidewalk, that’s something to complain about. But if there’s a lack of parking, that’s a different story. It would be like moving next to a firehouse and complaining about the sirens.

  45.  

    datbeezy

    what a shitty, worthless response.

  46.  

    Clarence Eckerson Jr.

    Every other city is 30 minutes. So we get a big bonus at 45. Besides you can always re-dock. I have taken 3 hour rides with 5 or 6 easy re-dockings. Never a problem.

  47.  

    r

    I don’t have a lot of sympathy for people who moved to Bergen Street any time within the last 100 years or so and are surprised to find that a lot of the parking is taken up by the precinct.

  48.  

    dporpentine

    Look at data for East Flatbush over the last ten years. You’ll see only minimal changes in economic and racial/ethnic composition.
    In any case, the median salary for a cop in NYC is over $61K.
    The focus on first-year salaries is so grossly misleading for cops.

  49.  

    Mike

    Ah, ok. I’d thought they were on 6th.

  50.  

    millerstephen