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Posts from the "NYPD Crash Data" Category

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NYPD: Drivers Injured 1,213 Pedestrians and Cyclists in August, and Killed 14

Image: NYPD

Image: NYPD

Twenty-two people died in New York City traffic in August, and 4,435 were injured, according to the monthly NYPD crash data report [PDF].

As of the end of August, 94 pedestrians and cyclists were reported killed by city motorists this year, and 9,593 injured, compared to 103 deaths and 10,336 injuries for the same period in 2013.

Citywide, at least 10 pedestrians and four cyclists were fatally struck by drivers: two pedestrians and one cyclist in Manhattan; one pedestrian in the Bronx; two pedestrians and one cyclist in Brooklyn; and five pedestrians and two cyclists in Queens. Among the victims were Karol Grzegorczyk, Jerrison Garcia, Shu Fan Huang, Menachem Galapo, and Silvia Gallo.

Motorists killed at least five pedestrians and three cyclists whose names were not immediately disclosed by NYPD, or whose deaths were not covered in the press. Most every month, there are pedestrian and cyclist deaths that go unreported other than the scant details provided weeks later in the NYPD dataset, which lists only the intersection closest to the crash and the victim’s mode of travel. These crashes are enumerated by WNYC on its “Mean Streets” page.

Motorists killed at least two seniors in August: Shu Fan Huang, 82, and an unnamed 79-year-old pedestrian in Queens.

Across the city, 722 pedestrians and 491 cyclists were reported hurt in collisions with motor vehicles. Per NYPD policy, few of these crashes were investigated by trained officers.

Of the fatal crashes reported by Streetsblog and other outlets, one motorist was known to have been charged for causing a death. Cab driver MD Hossain was charged under Section 19-190, the new law that makes it a misdemeanor for drivers to harm pedestrians and cyclists who have the right of way, for the death of Silvia Gallo. Nojeem Odunfa was cited for failure to exercise due care and charged with unlicensed driving following the crash that killed Jerrison Garcia. Historically, nearly half of motorists who kill a New York City pedestrian or cyclist do not receive so much as a citation for careless driving.

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NYPD: Drivers Injured 1,300 Pedestrians and Cyclists in July, and Killed 18

Image: NYPD

Image: NYPD

Twenty-eight people died in New York City traffic in July, and 4,571 were injured, according to the latest NYPD crash data report [PDF].

As of the end of July, 80 pedestrians and cyclists were reported killed by city motorists this year, and 8,380 injured, compared to 90 deaths and 8,958 injuries for the same period in 2013. Drivers killed more pedestrians and cyclists in July than in any other month to this point in 2014.

Citywide, at least 15 pedestrians and three cyclists were fatally struck by drivers: two pedestrians and one cyclist in Manhattan; one pedestrian in the Bronx; seven pedestrians and one cyclist in Brooklyn; three pedestrians and one cyclist in Queens; and two pedestrians in Staten Island. Among the victims were Joie Sellers, Jackie Haeflinger, Matthew Brenner, Jean Chambers, Avrohom Feldmaus, Sokhna Niang, Marie Valentino, Valding Duran, Margherita Nanfro, and Agatha Tsunis. Also killed were three unnamed pedestrians in Brooklyn, two unnamed pedestrians in Queens, an unnamed cyclist in Queens, and an unnamed pedestrian in Staten Island.

Motorists killed at least two children and four seniors in July: Joie Sellers, 12; Valding Duran, 13; Avrohom Feldmaus, 89; Marie Valentino, 91; Margherita Nanfro, 80; and Agatha Tsunis, 87.

Across the city, 772 pedestrians and 528 cyclists were reported hurt in collisions with motor vehicles. Per NYPD policy, few of these crashes were investigated by trained officers.

Of 18 fatal crashes reported by Streetsblog and other outlets, two motorists were known to have been charged for causing a death. Robert DeCarlo was charged with manslaughter for the Brooklyn hit-and-run curb jump crash that killed Joie Sellers, and Romulo Mejia was charged with manslaughter and DWI for killing an unnamed pedestrian in Queens. Historically, nearly half of motorists who kill a New York City pedestrian or cyclist do not receive so much as a citation for careless driving.

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NYC Traffic Injuries Down 6.6 Percent in First Half of 2014

Traffic injuries in New York City declined nearly 7 percent in the first six months of 2014 compared to the same period last year, according to NYPD data compiled by Streetsblog. Fatalities have also declined slightly, from 121 to 117.

The most significant drop in traffic deaths was among pedestrians, falling from 72 in the first six months of 2013 to 55 this year. Pedestrian injuries, which are less subject to random variation, declined 6.8 percent, nearly the same rate as overall traffic injuries.

While the decline in injuries suggests a tangible improvement in street safety, the precise causes are unclear. The deployment of speed cameras, increased NYPD enforcement of failure-to-yield violations, DOT street redesigns, and the harsh winter are all plausible factors.

The human toll — 24,383 injuries and 117 deaths — remains staggering and points to how much Mayor de Blasio and his commissioners at NYPD, DOT, and the TLC must change to achieve the administration’s Vision Zero goals.

While fewer lives have been lost on NYC streets in 2014 compared to 2013 and 2012, the first six months of 2011 saw fewer fatalities — 102, according to NYC DOT records. (NYPD’s monthly crash reports don’t go back to the beginning of 2011.) With 250 traffic deaths over the course of all 12 months, 2011 was the least deadly year on NYC streets in modern history.

Looking at vulnerable street users, drivers killed 63 pedestrians and cyclists in the first six months of 2014 and injured 7,080, compared to 78 deaths and 7,633 injuries for the same period in 2013. Below are the traffic violence summaries for the month of June, which NYPD recently posted online [PDF].

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NYPD: 1,263 Pedestrians and Cyclists Injured, 11 Killed in Traffic in May

Image: NYPD

Image: NYPD

Twenty-five people died in New York City traffic in May, and 4,621 were injured, according to the monthly NYPD crash data report [PDF].

As of the end of May, 54 pedestrians and cyclists were reported killed by city motorists this year, and 5,669 injured, compared to 64 deaths and 6,169 injuries for the same period in 2013.

Citywide, at least 10 pedestrians and two cyclists were fatally struck by drivers: three pedestrians in Manhattan; four pedestrians in Brooklyn; and three pedestrians and two cyclists in Queens. Among the victims were Rosa Anidjar, Felipe Palacios, Anthony Githere, Elliot Mintzer, William Faison, Galina Truglio, Charity Hicks, an unnamed female pedestrian in Manhattan, an unnamed male cyclist in Queens, two unidentified pedestrians in Brooklyn, and one unidentified pedestrian in Queens.

The NYPD report indicates there were nine pedestrian fatalities in May, but data compiled by Streetsblog from media sources and our own reporting show 10 pedestrian deaths.

Across the city, 882 pedestrians and 381 cyclists were reported hurt in collisions with motor vehicles. Per NYPD policy, few of these crashes were investigated by trained officers.

Of 12 fatal crashes reported by Streetsblog and other outlets, no motorists were known to have been charged for causing a death. Historically, nearly half of motorists who kill a New York City pedestrian or cyclist do not receive so much as a citation for careless driving.

Eleven motorists and three passengers died in the city in May; 1,557 and 1,801 were injured, respectively.

There were 18,172 motor vehicle crashes in the city in May, including 3,318 that resulted in injury or death.

Download May NYPD summons data here. NYPD posts geocoded crash data here. Crash and summons data from prior months is available in multiple formats here.

After the jump: contributing factors for crashes resulting in injury and death.

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NYPD: 1,160 Pedestrians and Cyclists Injured, Nine Killed in Traffic in April

Image: NYPD

Image: NYPD

Twenty-one people died in New York City traffic in April, and 4,007 were injured, according to the latest NYPD crash data report [PDF].

As of the end of April, 42 pedestrians and cyclists were reported killed by city motorists this year, and 4,406 injured, compared to 56 deaths and 4,793 injuries for the same period in 2013.

Citywide, at least eight pedestrians and one cyclist were fatally struck by drivers: two pedestrians in Manhattan; one pedestrian in the Bronx; two pedestrians and one cyclist in Brooklyn; and three pedestrians in Queens. Among the victims were Dwayne Dwyer, Angel Torres, Kelly Gordon, William Guevara-Delgado, Oscar Pauzhi, Bonnie Lewin, and one unidentified pedestrian each in Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Queens. Motorists killed at least one senior in April: Bonnie Lewin, 65.

Across the city, 854 pedestrians and 306 cyclists were reported hurt in collisions with motor vehicles. Per NYPD policy, few of these crashes were investigated by trained officers.

Of nine fatal crashes reported by Streetsblog and other outlets, no motorists were known to have been charged for causing a death. Historically, nearly half of motorists who kill a New York City pedestrian or cyclist do not receive so much as a citation for careless driving.

Six motorists and six passengers died in the city in April; 1,305 and 1,542 were injured, respectively.

There were 16,265 motor vehicle crashes in the city last month, including 2,977 that resulted in injury or death.

NYPD summons data for April is not online as of this writing. NYPD posts geocoded crash data here. Crash and summons data from prior months is available in multiple formats here.

After the jump: contributing factors for crashes resulting in injury and death.

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Ben Kallos Seeks to Make NYPD Traffic Summons Data Open and Mappable

As part of a raft of bills on government data and transparency, Council Member Ben Kallos has introduced legislation that would require the city to release and map data about where NYPD issues moving violations, among other things. The bill would open up new traffic enforcement information to the public, but it might also require a top-to-bottom overhaul of how city agencies issue and process violation notices.

A new bill could require NYPD to change the way it tracks and releases data about moving violations. Photo: Runs With Scissors/Flickr

A new bill could help New Yorkers see if NYPD is issuing traffic violations at the locations most in need of enforcement. Photo: Ken Stein/Flickr

Currently, information on moving violations is available only at the precinct level, aggregated in reports on the NYPD website each month. The Kallos bill would require NYPD to specify the date, time, and location of each moving violation in updates posted at least monthly. The bill calls for precise latitude and longitude coordinates, but allows for data to be coded to the nearest intersection.

“There’s a lot of fascinating questions you could explore,” said statistics professor and I Quant NY blogger Ben Wellington, who was particularly interested in tracking whether high-crash areas are also receiving the highest levels of enforcement. ”In a Vision Zero plan, you probably want to shift resources to places where there are the most problems but the least resources,” he said.

City agencies would themselves benefit from user-friendly data releases. “Getting this crime, crash and summonses data online in a usable form would help the police share it both internally and with other agencies,” said John Kaehny, executive director of Reinvent Albany, in a statement. ”We strongly support the intent of this bill, and would like to see the NYPD and City Hall work with CM Kallos and the public to open this data.”

The bill is sponsored by Kallos, Peter Koo, and Rory Lancman, and has also received encouragement from other key council members. Technology Committee Chair James Vacca told Streetsblog last month that he supports releasing geo-coded moving violations data. A spokesperson for Brad Lander said the bill included “good next steps.” Transportation Committee Chair Ydanis Rodriguez said in a statement that he is ”hopeful to see this bill pass.”

The amount of work NYPD would have to undertake to comply with the bill’s mandate remains an open question. The DMV’s traffic ticket form, used by the police department, only has a “place of occurrence” line, in which officers can write a location. This type of non-standardized information is near-impossible to sort geographically.

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NYPD: 1,141 Pedestrians and Cyclists Injured, 11 Killed in Traffic in March

Image: NYPD

Image: NYPD

Eighteen people died in New York City traffic in March, and 3,829 were injured, according to the March NYPD crash data report [PDF].

As of the end of March, 33 pedestrians and cyclists were reported killed by city motorists this year, and 3,246 injured, compared to 45 deaths and 3,590 injuries for the same period in 2013.

Citywide, at least 11 pedestrians were fatally struck by drivers: two in Manhattan; one in the Bronx; four in Brooklyn; and four in Queens. Among the victims were Marisol Martinez, Kumar Ragunath, Roshard Charles, Marlene Baharlias, Pei Yao Wu, Ida Rosenblatt, Lisa Julian, an unidentified male pedestrian in Queens, a second unidentified pedestrian in Queens, and one unidentified pedestrian in Manhattan. At least one child and three seniors were killed by motorists: Roshard Charles, 3; Marlene Baharlias, 77; Pei Yao Wu, 82; and Ida Rosenblatt, 87.

NYPD reported no cyclist fatalities in March.

Across the city, 952 pedestrians and 189 cyclists were reported hurt in collisions with motor vehicles. Per NYPD policy, few of these crashes were investigated by trained officers.

Of 11 fatal crashes reported by Streetsblog and other outlets, no motorists were known to have been charged for causing a death. Historically, nearly half of motorists who kill a New York City pedestrian or cyclist do not receive so much as a citation for careless driving.

Six motorists and one passenger died in the city in March; 1,266 and 1,422 were injured, respectively.

There were 15,796 motor vehicle crashes in the city in March, including 2,799 that resulted in injury or death.

Download March NYPD summons data here. NYPD posts geocoded crash data here. Crash and summons data from prior months is available in multiple formats here.

After the jump: contributing factors for crashes resulting in injury and death.

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Advocates Urge Lander to Upgrade NYPD Crash Data Bill

A bill that would have pushed Ray Kelly’s police department one step closer to opening up crash data has been reintroduced by Council Member Brad Lander. But with new leadership, NYPD is dropping hints that it will release better public data soon. Advocates say Lander’s bill could use some upgrades to help the public get more out of NYPD’s crash data.

Mandating a crash map is good, but getting better traffic safety data from NYPD is better. Image: NYC Crashmapper

A few months after the City Council required the NYPD to create an online crime map last year, Lander introduced a bill to add crash data to the mix. At a hearing on the bill last October, NYPD pushed back. Assistant Commissioner of Intergovernmental Affairs Susan Petito said a crash map would confuse the public because DMV reports require that crashes are mapped to the nearest intersection and not their exact location. She also rebuffed a suggestion that NYPD work with the DMV to fix the problem by changing the forms.

Since then, there’s been an election and several changes at NYPD. Chief of Transportation Thomas Chan told Streetsblog last month that the department is working on adding crash data and other “information [that] might not have been previously available to the public” to the city’s Vision Zero website. He also said he’s looking to work with the DMV on improving its crash report forms, but wouldn’t go into specifics.

Also last month, Lander reintroduced his crash data bill. But so far the bill hasn’t been revised to reflect current needs. It would require NYPD to take data it currently releases in a convoluted format and put it on a map, which street safety advocates have already figured out how to do. They’re asking Lander to upgrade the bill with a more substantial open data mandate.

Noel Hidalgo, executive director of BetaNYC (a local Code for America affiliate), called Lander’s bill “a good start” but said the legislation would be a missed opportunity if it passes in its current form. “Ideally, in the big picture, we wouldn’t be legislating for the creation of a map,” he said. “We would be strengthening the legislation around Council Member Lappin’s original CrashStat bill.”

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NYPD: 914 Pedestrians and Cyclists Injured, Nine Killed in Traffic in February

Image: NYPD

Image: NYPD

Twelve people died in New York City traffic in February, and 3,077 were injured, according to the latest NYPD crash data report [PDF].

As of the end of February, 22 pedestrians and cyclists were reported killed by city motorists this year, and 2,105 injured, compared to 33 deaths and 2,408 injuries for the same period in 2013. NYPD reported fewer pedestrian and cyclist injuries in February — 914 — than in any other month since January 2012.

Citywide, at least eight pedestrians and one cyclist were fatally struck by drivers: five pedestrians and a cyclist in Brooklyn, and three pedestrians in Queens. Among the victims were Jelani Irving, Martha Tibillin-Guamug, Ruben Rivera, Margarita Seda, Kaneez Hussein, and Gedalia Gruntzweig. At least three seniors were killed by motorists in February: Ruben Rivera, 81; Margarita Seda, 80; and Kaneez Hussein, 73.

Another pedestrian, Stanislav Chernyshov, 73, was struck and killed by a backhoe operator in Brooklyn.

Across the city, 820 pedestrians and 94 cyclists were reported hurt in collisions with motor vehicles. Per NYPD policy, few of these crashes were investigated by trained officers.

Of nine fatal crashes reported by Streetsblog and other outlets, no motorists were known to have been charged for causing a death. Historically, nearly half of motorists who kill a New York City pedestrian or cyclist do not receive so much as a citation for careless driving.

Two motorists and one passenger died in the city in February; 1,028 and 1,135 were injured, respectively.

There were 15,683 motor vehicle crashes in the city last month, including 2,324 that resulted in injury or death.

Download February NYPD summons data here. Crashes are mapped here. Crash and summons data from prior months is available in multiple formats here.

After the jump: contributing factors in injury and fatal crashes.

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Heat Maps Show Where Traffic Takes the Most Lives in NYC

2013 traffic deaths. Image: I Quant NY

2013 traffic deaths. Image: I Quant NY

As city government started work on the Vision Zero Action Plan, statistics professor Ben Wellington saw an opportunity to use data on crashes and fatalities to show the magnitude of the challenge.

Wellington teaches a statistics course to Pratt Institute city planning students using open data from New York City government. He also uses city data to create maps on his blog, I Quant NY. This week, he mapped last year’s traffic fatalities and cyclist injuries, using NYPD data compiled by volunteers developers into the Crash Data Band-Aid.

Wellington’s results show some familiar patterns: Streets like Broadway in Williamsburg, Queens Boulevard, and Grand Concourse pop up in the fatality data, in addition to spikes of traffic fatalities in neighborhoods from Canarsie to Jackson Heights to Midtown. Using city-defined neighborhood boundaries, Wellington calculated that 23 percent of all traffic deaths last year occurred in just five percent of the city’s neighborhoods, though fatalities were spread across the city.

Last year, there were more than 3,800 reported cyclist injuries in New York City. Image: I Quant NY

Last year, there were more than 3,800 reported cyclist injuries in New York City. Image: I Quant NY

There were more than 3,800 reported cyclist injuries last year, with the highest concentrations in Williamsburg, Clinton Hill, Jackson Heights, and Manhattan below 59th Street. Wellington notes that this geographic concentration could be reflective of where the greatest number of people are riding bikes, not necessarily the most dangerous places for cyclists. Though the total number of crashes may be high in a particular zone, Wellington says, the crash rate is likely to be lower due to the high ridership density in the area.

“The hope is that with Vision Zero in place,” he wrote, “future maps like this will be much sparser.”