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Posts from the "Andrew Cuomo" Category

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Cuomo to Spend Lion’s Share of NY Bank Settlement Windfall on Highways

 

 

One of the looming questions as Governor Andrew Cuomo has unveiled his budget agenda over the past few days has been how he’ll divvy up the $5.4 billion windfall the state has reaped from bank settlements. At the State of the State address this afternoon, Cuomo revealed that the biggest chunk of that money will go to the Thruway Authority so highway drivers don’t have to pay higher tolls.

Of the nearly $1.7 billion for road and rail projects in Cuomo’s plan, more than three-quarters — $1.285 billion — would get sucked up by the Thruway Authority and the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge.

The MTA gets two comparatively small slices. The most significant is $250 million to bring Metro-North to Penn Station and build four new stations along the Hell Gate Line in the Bronx. This project was already in the MTA’s pipeline, so the allocation should shrink the $15.2 billion gap in the agency’s capital program by a small amount.

Cuomo also announced $150 million in settlement cash for parking garages at one Metro-North and two Long Island Rail Road stations — an idea that, like the Willets Point AirTrain, he sprung on the public yesterday. This is a subsidy for suburban commuters who park and ride at what are supposed to be transit-oriented development hubs.

But that’s all small potatoes compared to the chunk of change heading to the Thruway. It’s still not clear how much of the $1.285 billion will be for Tappan Zee construction and how much will be to directly bail out the authority’s deteriorating finances. Either way, this is money that will basically be used to keep drivers from squawking about tolls that better reflect the true cost of road building and maintenance.

Sorry, straphangers.

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Cuomo’s LaGuardia Train Would Be Slower Than Existing Transit

When it comes to travel times, Cuomo’s proposed LaGuardia AirTrain wouldn’t fare well compared to existing bus and subway service. Graph: The Transportation Politic

When it comes to travel times, Cuomo’s proposed LaGuardia AirTrain wouldn’t fare well compared to existing bus and subway service. Graph: The Transport Politic

The centerpiece of Governor Cuomo’s second-term transportation agenda for New York City isn’t closing the $15 billion gap in the MTA capital program or taking serious steps to relieve the city from suffocating traffic. Instead, Cuomo’s big idea is a new rail link to LaGuardia Airport.

The idea captivated the Times and distracted from the meat of Cuomo’s proposals, which mostly involve subsidizing highways and bridges so Thruway tolls don’t go up. But it won’t make it any faster to get to LaGuardia without driving, writes Yonah Freemark at the Transport Politic.

As difficult as it can be to get to LaGuardia now, Freemark says Cuomo’s AirTrain proposal — which would run along public rights-of-way between the airport and the 7 train at Willets Point — would have longer travel times than existing transit routes from most parts of the city. ”As proposed, the project would do next to nothing to improve access to the airport,” he writes.

Freemark’s analysis, which he summarized in the above chart, finds that the Cuomo AirTrain would offer no improvement over current transit service for travelers heading from the airport to Grand Central, Penn Station (except via the LIRR on Mets game days, when trip times would be slightly faster than today), the World Trade Center, Borough Hall/Jay Street, and Jamaica. Travel times to the South Bronx (Yankee Stadium) would be nearly twice as long as existing options. If you happen to live in the immediate vicinity of the proposed Willets Point AirTrain connection, then you might save some time.

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Cuomo’s Transpo Vision: Huge Garages, Cheap Roads, Lots More MTA Debt

A day before his big statewide policy address, Governor Andrew Cuomo laid out his transportation and infrastructure agenda today at a Midtown breakfast hosted by the Association for a Better New York, a business group. This was not the speech where the governor finally laid out his plan to prevent runaway MTA debt, fix the traffic that is choking New York City’s economy, and revive cities around the state by tearing out decrepit 20th century highways and redeveloping downtowns.

Governor Cuomo talks transportation this morning. Photo: Governor's Office/Flickr

Governor Cuomo talks transportation this morning. Photo: Governor’s Office/Flickr

Instead, surprising no one, Cuomo promised subsidies to keep highway tolls cheap, train stations with tons of parking, and economic development centered around airports. The speech did not even mention the most pressing transportation issue in New York right now: the $15 billion gap in the MTA’s five-year capital program.

Cuomo did mention that the capital program will pay for new buses and subway cars, the Second Avenue subway, Metro-North along the Hell Gate Line, signal upgrades, and Bus Rapid Transit (which he called “a big part of the future”) — all part of the plan already. The governor also touted an attention-grabbing new proposal to build an AirTrain line to LaGuardia Airport from the Long Island Rail Road and 7 train stations at Willets Point, a 30-minute subway ride from Times Square.

Cuomo said the LaGuardia project is in “initial planning phases,” though the administration expects the 1.5-mile line to cost $450 million and take the Port Authority, in consultation with the MTA, five years to build. (A more direct proposal to extend the N train from Astoria to LaGuardia, championed by Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, was scuttled by NIMBY opposition more than a decade ago.) Cuomo also proposed tax-free zones for businesses near Stewart and Republic airports in a bid to boost freight traffic there.

Meanwhile, the most significant new MTA proposal unveiled this morning involves building garages for park-and-ride commuters to Metro-North and LIRR stations at Ronkonkoma, Nassau Hub near Roosevelt Field, and Lighthouse Landing in Tarrytown. Tellingly, the images that flashed on screen as Cuomo spoke did not depict parking structures, but tree-lined streets with apartments and retail from transit-oriented development projects in Westchester County and Long Island. The state will subsidize the garages to the tune of $150 million, according to a press release, but it’s not clear if this will cover the total cost and, if not, whether the MTA will be on the hook for the rest.

The governor wants New Yorkers to think that this infrastructure construction will come at essentially no cost. “All the costs will be from existing state resources,” Cuomo said. He mentioned the $5 billion bank settlement windfall as a potential source of funding, but his staff couldn’t say after the event exactly how much of that kitty might go to transportation.

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With Opening at DMV, Cuomo Has Opportunity to Lead on Street Safety

With the retirement of Barbara Fiala, the top position at the Department of Motor Vehicles is vacant, giving Governor Andrew Cuomo an opportunity to appoint someone who will use the state’s oversight of driver education, training, and licensing to improve street safety and prevent traffic deaths.

Will Governor Cuomo reform the DMV during his second term? Photo: Diana Robinson/Flickr

Will Governor Cuomo reform the DMV during his second term? Photo: Diana Robinson/Flickr

Fiala, 70, is a Democrat who served as Broome County executive before Cuomo tapped her to head the DMV soon after he took office in 2011. Her last day was Tuesday, according to papers state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli’s office provided to Gannett.

Fiala’s tenure at DMV had several low points on the street safety front.

Months after she arrived at the agency in 2011, Fiala proposed eliminating the eye exam as a requirement for renewing a license. The idea was that drivers would instead “self-certify.” That plan was scrapped under public pressure, including from the governor’s office.

Later, Fiala focused on improving online customer service and increasing organ donation rates, according to a profile that was recently removed from the department’s website. The bio also mentions the DMV commissioner’s role as chair of the Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee, which distributes federal road safety funds across the state.

In October, Fiala was pulled over in Broome County and given a speeding ticket for driving 47 mph in a 30 mph zone. She mailed in the ticket and pleaded not guilty, according to Gannett. Days earlier, her son, Broome County legislator Anthony Fiala Jr., pleaded guilty to drunken driving after hitting and injuring a Binghamton bicyclist before leaving the scene.

The agency was in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons again in November, after a DMV administrative judge dismissed two minor summonses issued to Ahmad Abu-Zayedeha, the driver who killed 3-year-old Allison Liao as she held her grandmother’s hand in a Flushing crosswalk. Video evidence of the crash was not shown at the hearing, which lasted 47 seconds. It’s unclear if the judge even knew that Abu-Zayedeh had killed someone before he threw out the tickets.

After the Liao family learned that Abu-Zayedeha’s tickets had been dismissed, members of Families For Safe Streets met with a top transportation deputy from the governor’s office to talk about DMV reform. The families had expected to meet Fiala at the meeting, but she did not show.

In November, Transportation Alternatives called on Cuomo to replace Fiala with “a safety-minded reformer.” Now that she has retired, Cuomo has a chance to turn the state DMV into a national leader, with rigorous education and licensing requirements for motor vehicle operators to reduce the state’s traffic fatality rate.

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This Fare Hike Is Just a Hint of What’s to Come

Graph: Office of the State Comptroller

The amount the MTA spends on debt service has nearly tripled since 2003, much faster growth than the operating budget overall, which has increased about 60 percent. Graph: Office of the State Comptroller

With the MTA set to raise fares 4 percent over the next two years, it’s time for the bi-annual spectacle of fare hike hearings, where political appointees absorb the brunt of straphanger anger so Governor Cuomo doesn’t have to.

This time around, the proposed increase in fares isn’t that big — a larger hike was in the works until the MTA’s short-term financial outlook took a turn for the better. But unless Albany closes the gap in the MTA capital program, future fare hikes are going to look a whole lot worse. Every dollar that the MTA has to borrow will end up costing transit riders down the line, as the agency devotes an increasing share of its operating budget to debt service.

In their testimony, the Straphangers Campaign and the Riders Alliance urged riders to take their complaints to Cuomo. The governor, more than anyone, has the power to raise revenue and contain costs to keep the MTA’s debt at manageable levels. So far, though, Cuomo has shown nothing but an aversion to dealing with the $15 billion gap in the agency’s next five-year capital program.

If Cuomo fails to close the gap, transit riders will be looking at much more than a 4 percent fare hike. After taking on $15 billion in additional debt, the MTA would be saddled with interest payments that equate to a 15 percent fare hike, according to an October report from State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli [PDF]. That’s more than three times the size of the current increase.

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It’s His Commission: Blame Cuomo for MTA’s Underwhelming “Reinvention”

The MTA Reinvention Commission report, the product of months of work from a panel of experts, was unceremoniously dumped to the press by the governor’s office at 5:30 p.m. yesterday, shortly before Thanksgiving. While the document [PDF] includes a number of worthwhile suggestions, it fails to seriously grapple with the biggest challenges facing New York’s transit system. The MTA’s astronomical construction costs and the substantial systemwide benefits of funding transit with road pricing get only cursory mentions. This is disappointing, but not surprising, since the report is a reflection of the man who created and controlled the commission: Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Photo: MTA/Flickr

Photo: MTA/Flickr

Cuomo’s disinterest in transit goes back to the start of his administration. After a campaign where he cast doubts on the Payroll Mobility Tax that stabilized the MTA’s finances in 2009, Cuomo followed through in first year in office by cutting the PMT.

Cuomo has dipped into the MTA budget multiple times by diverting dedicated transit funding to the state’s general fund. When the legislature passed bills to require more disclosure of raids, Cuomo blew open a loophole and vetoed an effort to close it, all while denying that his financial maneuvers amounted to transit raids at all.

In an election-year stunt this February, Cuomo gave Staten Island voters drivers a 50 cent toll cut in February — a political ploy that came at transit riders’ expense.

When Cuomo worked out a labor agreement to avoid a Long Island Rail Road strike earlier this year, he hosted a press conference where smiles were in abundance but details about how much the deal would cost were not. Months later, it was revealed that new labor deals would cost the MTA at least $1.28 billion through 2017, paid for by cuts to retiree fund contributions and the authority’s own capital budget. Absent from the new labor agreements: Work rule reforms to ensure that, in addition to compensating employees well, operating funds are spent efficiently.

All the while, costs and delays continue to spiral upwards on the authority’s big-ticket projects, leading MTA Chairman and CEO Tom Prendergast to admit that large-scale capital construction might not be one of the authority’s “core competencies.”

Why does it takes so much time and so much money for the MTA to do things compared to its peer systems? The report acknowledged these problems but failed to offer much in the way of critical analysis or specific solutions, similar to how it failed to zero in on road pricing as an ideal revenue stream that can both lower the agency’s debt load and dramatically improve systemwide bus performance. (For some more food for thought about what’s missing from the report, read Alon Levy’s post at Pedestrian Observations.)

Don’t blame the commission for these shortcomings though. Blame Andrew Cuomo. He created the commission, so it’s no coincidence that it produced a document that skirts the most politically sensitive issues. The report is another sign that Cuomo’s interest in transit doesn’t extend deeper than press releases and photo-ops. The governor has no intention of confronting contractors, unions, or motorists to make a transit system that works better for all New Yorkers.

Streetsblog will not be publishing on Thursday or Friday. Happy Thanksgiving, and we’ll see you on Monday. 

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Families for Safe Streets Meets With Cuomo Rep to Talk DMV Reforms

In a meeting with representatives from Governor Andrew Cuomo’s administration Tuesday, members of Families for Safe Streets called for reforms to New York State Department of Motor Vehicles protocols, with the goal of discouraging reckless driving and obtaining some measure of justice for crash victims and their families.

New York State DMV Commissioner Barbara Fiala did not attend a Tuesday meeting with family members of traffic violence victims. Photo: NYS DMV

New York State DMV Commissioner Barbara Fiala did not attend a Tuesday meeting with family members of traffic violence victims. Photo: NYS DMV

Karen Rae, Cuomo’s deputy transportation secretary, met with relatives of crash victims at the governor’s Manhattan office. The meeting was arranged by Congresswoman Grace Meng [PDF], and was prompted by news that the DMV voided both traffic tickets issued by NYPD to the driver who killed 3-year-old Allison Liao in Queens in 2013.

A recording obtained by WNYC reveals that the administrative judge rushed through the hearing and declared the driver, 44-year-old Ahmad Abu-Zayedeh, ”not guilty” in a matter of seconds. The video that captured the collision was never screened.

Allison’s parents, Amy Tam and Hsi-Pei Liao, attended yesterday’s meeting. Also present were Amy Cohen, mother of Sammy Cohen Eckstein; Kevin Sami, whose father was killed in a crash; and attorney Steve Vaccaro. J. David Sampson, the agency’s executive deputy commissioner, represented the DMV. DMV Commissioner Barbara Fiala was expected to attend but was not there.

Officials and advocates discussed the January DMV “safety hearing” scheduled for Abu-Zayedeh, as well as last January’s hearing for the driver who killed Brooklyn pedestrian Clara Heyworth, when a DMV administrative judge relied mainly on the motorist’s own testimony to determine whether or not he would be allowed to drive legally again.

Families for Safe Streets presented the following recommendations to DMV:

  • A mandatory three-month license suspension for serious offenses while driving, including (a) hit and run; (b) aggravated unlicensed operation; (c) failure to use due care (VTL 1146); and (d) striking someone with the right of way (per NYC Administrative Code Section 19-190).
  • Reform the DMV point system so that higher point values apply to violations where someone is seriously injured or killed; prevent drivers from using adjournments to push points outside the 18-month window and avoid suspension.
  • Greater accountability for commercial drivers, enforced by a mandatory three-month or longer license suspension upon accrual of six or more penalty points.
  • Mandatory, prompt and publicly-noticed safety hearings at which victims, their families, and NYPD crash investigators can attend, present evidence and make statements; quarterly reporting of aggregate safety hearing outcomes and other statistics.
  • DMV’s adoption of the equivalent of the Federal Crime Victim’s Bill of Rights for victims’ families at traffic ticket hearings related to fatal crashes.

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Nine NYC Bike-Ped Projects Get Federal Funds From State DOT

Nine bicycle and pedestrian projects in New York City are receiving federal funds distributed through New York State DOT, according to an announcement late last month by Governor Andrew Cuomo. The projects range from pedestrian safety fixes on streets near busy expressways to upgraded plazas and greenways.

Image: Parks Department

$2.5 million is going to the Bronx River Greenway through Shoelace Park. Image: Parks Department

The New York City awards are:

  • South Bronx Greenway: This project is focused on bicycle and pedestrian safety improvements along Bruckner Boulevard south of Hunts Point Avenue, linking to a greenway to Randall’s Island. The grant covers $2.5 million of the project’s $3.15 million total cost.
  • Kent Avenue South: Earlier this year, a separated bike path was installed on Kent Avenue from Clymer Street to Williamsburg Street West. The project would upgrade the path, which is part of the Brooklyn Waterfront Greenway, with permanent materials. The grant covers $2.5 million of the project’s $4.3 million total cost.
  • Atlantic Avenue: This project, covering 22 blocks in East New York, includes expanded medians, new street trees, wayfinding signage, and possibly street seating. The grant covers $2.5 million of the project’s $8.5 million total cost.
  • Fourth Avenue: An existing road diet in Park Slope and Sunset Park is being upgraded with permanent materials. This round of funding will build two phases of the project, first from 33rd to 47th Streets and then from 8th to 18th Streets. Widened medians will include trees, shrubs, benches, and pedestrian wayfinding. The grant covers $2.5 million of the project’s $10 million total cost.
  • Safe Routes to School projects: Areas near seven schools will receive pedestrian refuge islands, sidewalk extensions, curb extensions, and intersection realigments. The schools are PS 135, David Grayson Christian Academy/PS 191, and PS 361 in Brooklyn; PS 95 and PS 35 in Queens, PS 170 in the Bronx; and PS 20 in Staten Island. The grant covers $2.4 million of the projects’ $3 million total cost.
  • Morrison Avenue plaza: The plaza will span 9,000 square feet of sidewalk and street space at the intersection of Westchester Avenue, Morrison Avenue, and Harrod Place in Soundview. The project includes bike parking, wayfinding, landscaping, and street lighting. The grant covers $2.5 million of the project’s $3.1 million total cost.
  • Industry City pedestrian improvements: Spurred by a request from the owners of Industry City, Third Avenue beneath the Gowanus Expressway is set to receive street lights, pedestrian signage, and crosswalks. The upgrades will be at the intersections with 29th to 39th Streets. The grant covers $956,000 of the project’s $1.6 million total cost.
  • Bronx River Greenway Shoelace Link: A 1.2-mile link in the Bronx River Greenway will be completed through Shoelace Park, stretching from East Gun Hill Road to 233rd Street in Woodlawn. Unlike other projects, which are administered by DOT, the greenway link is a project of the Parks Department. In addition to the greenway, it will feature stormwater runoff bioswales, bike racks, benches, and signage. The grant covers $2.5 million of the project’s $3.25 million total cost.

This announcement is the latest in a line of bike-ped funding announcements from the Cuomo administration. Before this year, the state had been sluggish in getting bike-ped grants out the door to local communities.

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Livable Streets Progress in Albany Will Have to Go Through a GOP Senate

Andrew Cuomo may have won re-election, but New York was no exception to the national Republican wave in yesterday’s elections. The GOP regained control of the State Senate, weakening its bond with the Independent Democratic Conference and keeping mainline Democrats in the minority. With last night’s results, the landscape for transit and livable streets legislation in Albany has shifted.

Dean Skelos, right, is back as the sole leader of the State Senate. What will it mean for the MTA? Photo: MTA/Flickr

Dean Skelos, right, could come back as the sole leader of the State Senate. What will it mean for transit in NYC? Photo: MTA/Flickr

Republicans now have 32 of 63 seats in the State Senate. They gained control by ousting three upstate Democrats and losing only one seat, in a tight three-way Buffalo-area race. The balance of power no longer rests with the breakaway IDC, which formed a power-sharing agreement with Republicans. Leadership of the Senate could be consolidated next session in Dean Skelos of Long Island, who currently splits control with IDC leader Jeff Klein.

With Republicans in the majority, NYC’s two GOP senators — Martin Golden of Brooklyn and Andrew Lanza of Staten Island, who both won re-election last night – will be key for any street safety legislation affecting the city. Golden initially resisted speed camera legislation earlier this year, though he ultimately voted for the bill. Lanza is best known to Streetsblog readers for refusing to allow flashing lights on Select Bus Service vehicles.

The rest of the statewide political landscape did not change much. The Assembly will remain in the hands of Democrats, led by Speaker Sheldon Silver. Silver and Skelos will return to Albany next year with Comptroller Tom DiNapoli, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, and Governor Cuomo, who all secured expected victories over Republican challengers.

The most pressing transportation issue facing Cuomo, Silver, and Skelos — the proverbial “three men in a room” — will be closing the $15.2 billion gap in the MTA capital program.

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It’s Cuomo vs. Transit Experts on MTA Funding

Yesterday, Governor Andrew Cuomo called the region’s transit investment plan “bloated” and rejected calls for new revenue. Today, MTA Chairman and CEO Tom Prendergast, speaking at a forum on best practices in regional transit governance, hammered home the need for elected officials to find new money to fill the half-funded capital plan’s $15 billion gap.

The MTA's boss isn't terribly interested in funding transit. Actually, he called the capital plan "bloated." Photo: MTA/Flickr

The MTA’s boss isn’t terribly interested in transit investments. Actually, he called the capital plan “bloated.” Photo: MTA/Flickr

“This is the start of a process. This is the start of a dialogue,” Prendergast told reporters when asked about the governor’s comments. He refused to agree with the governor’s assertion that the capital plan should be trimmed, and indicated that without new funding, the MTA would resort to increasing its debt load above already record levels. “I don’t like greater debt finance, but I’ll tell you what,” he said during the panel, “I’ll treat that finance as a bridge to another day.”

Today, debt service eats up an ever-greater share of the authority’s budget, with the MTA spending almost as much in debt service as it does to operate Metro-North and Long Island Rail Road service combined. During his comments yesterday, Cuomo also repeated his rejection of toll reform or other new sources of revenue to help fill the capital program’s gap and reduce the MTA’s reliance on debt.

“At some point the interest payments on MTA debt are going to completely implode any capacity to do anything for the MTA going forward,” said Chris Ward, Dragados USA executive vice president and former Port Authority executive director. “The toll structure has reached [the end of] its useful life,” he said. “Public transit is going to have to face, fundamentally, a question of funding, and what the mechanisms are going to be.”

The panel this morning, hosted by the Eno Center for Transportation, TransitCenter, and the Regional Plan Association, marked the release of a new report examining the governance of regional transit systems in New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Dallas, and the Minneapolis-St. Paul area [PDF].

While panelists noted that New York often serves as a model for other systems, the MTA came in for serious criticism on the way it is governed by its board members and the governor who appoints them.

New York’s governor calls the shots with state authorities, noted Robert “Buzz” Paaswell, director of the University Transportation Research Center at City College. During a training for board members of state authorities, Paaswell asked them if they would disagree with the governor if his wishes contradicted the best interests of the authority. ”Ninety percent of the board members would say, ‘I would do what the governor says; he appointed me,’” he said. “Even if that goes against the interest of the authority.’”

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