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Posts from the Staten Island Category

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Ride With Clarence on the Tour de Staten Island


Close to 2,000 people turned out Sunday for Transportation Alternatives’ 2015 Tour de Staten Island. For the event’s fifth year, riders were treated to areas of the new Fresh Kills Park that aren’t yet open to the public. Other highlights included oceanside riding and views of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, where the Harbor Ring Committee continues to advocate for bike and pedestrian access.

Naturally, Streetfilms’ Clarence Eckerson was there.

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MTA Tests Bike Racks on Bus Across Verrazano

An anonymously-sourced New York Post story yesterday might leave readers with the impression that new bike racks on the front of Staten Island buses will lead to late trips and a liability nightmare for the MTA. The MTA, however, says it’s still studying the racks — a tried-and-true amenity in every other big American city — on a route crossing the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, which currently has no bike path.

Bus racks on the front of a bus in downtown Vancouver, BC. Photo: Stephen Rees/Flickr

Bus racks on the front of a bus in downtown Vancouver, BC. Photo: Stephen Rees/Flickr

Here’s the Post story, in full:

City buses on Staten Island will soon sport bike racks as part of a New York City Transit program that bus drivers are already slamming as a surefire way to slow down commuters.

Drivers on the S53 bus line, which runs between Port Richmond and Bay Ridge in Brooklyn, will be required under the pilot plan to wait for passengers to load their wheels.

“The consensus right now — no one’s crazy about it,” said a transit source who works at Staten Island’s Castleton depot. “If the bike falls off, it’s on us. If it gets damaged, it’s on us.”

Bike racks on buses are common in less congested cities.

New York is the only major city in the country without bike racks on its buses, according to the Alliance for Biking and Walking, with cities as large and congested as Washington, Chicago, Philadelphia, and San Francisco outfitting their entire bus fleets with bike racks — all without major liability or on-time performance problems.

So will Staten Island residents get to make multi-modal trips to Brooklyn? Not in the immediate future, according to the MTA. “It was a test, not a pilot program,” said MTA spokesperson Amanda Kwan. The test occurred on March 3, she said, and consisted of “one run, on the S53 route with a non-revenue bus. The rack equipment itself was also being tested.”

The MTA would not reveal further information about the test. “It is simply too early to have or release any more details,” Kwan said.

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Pedestrian Deaths Have Fallen in Every Borough Except Staten Island

Pedestrian fatalities in New York City have been cut in half over the past three decades -- except for Staten Island. Chart: DOT

Pedestrian deaths in New York City have dropped by half over three decades — except for Staten Island. Chart: DOT

DOT released the final installment of its pedestrian safety plans yesterday with a report for Staten Island [PDF], where the nature of pedestrian crashes is different than in the other boroughs.

Map: DOT

DOT’s priority areas cover locations where nearly three-quarters of Staten Island’s pedestrian deaths or serious injuries occurred. Click to enlarge. Map: DOT

Over the past three decades, the city as a whole grew approximately 19 percent while the number of pedestrian fatalities was cut in half. On Staten Island, while the population has increased at a more rapid clip of 30 percent, pedestrian fatalities have not declined at all.

On average, about 40 pedestrians are severely injured and seven are killed on Staten Island streets each year. The borough’s rate of 1.4 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 residents is lower than the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, or Queens.

But that doesn’t mean, as Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg told the Advance, that “Staten Island is by far the safest borough.” Because people don’t walk as much in Staten Island as they do in other boroughs,  it’s difficult to compare to other parts of the city — but the risk of getting around on foot is still substantial.

DOT’s report notes that most of Staten Island is auto-dependent, with 82 percent of households owning at least one car, almost double the citywide average. Two-thirds of Staten Islanders drive to work, more than double the citywide rate.

The North Shore is less car-dependent than the rest of Staten Island, and that’s where pedestrian deaths are concentrated. The area east of the Bayonne Bridge and north of the Staten Island Expressway accounts for about 45 percent of the borough’s pedestrian fatalities and serious injuries, but only 18 percent of its land area. (Outside of the North Shore, Hylan Boulevard is another danger zone.)

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Steve Matteo and NY1: A Speed Camera Is Working, So Vision Zero Is a Scam

Amanda Farinacci witnessed a “notorious” speed camera lighting up outside a Staten Island elementary school, but saw no speeding drivers. Image: NY1

NY1 reporter Amanda Farinacci witnessed a “notorious” speed camera lighting up outside a Staten Island elementary school, but saw no speeding drivers. Image: NY1

Speeding is the leading cause of fatal traffic crashes in New York City, and with unreliable police enforcement, cameras are essential to protecting New Yorkers from reckless drivers. Data released last summer showed that 20 speed cameras, covering a tiny fraction city streets, issued roughly as many speeding tickets in one month as NYPD did in six months.

Data also show that as drivers become accustomed to traffic cameras, law-breaking becomes less frequent. DOT says this happened after a camera was installed on Goethals Road in Staten Island, according to a report from NY1’s Amanda Farinacci. But the crux of Farinacci’s story isn’t a camera slowing drivers near an elementary school. It’s that speed cameras, and the Vision Zero initiative itself, are a money-making “scam.”

Says Farinacci:

In just 15 minutes time, NY1 witnessed the speed camera flashing eight times. At that rate, it could go off more than 30 times an hour. And with a $50 fine that means it’s big bucks for the city.

Farinacci could have reported that NY1 witnessed eight drivers exceeding the speed limit by 11 or more miles per hour outside a school, and that, thanks to restrictions mandated by Albany, the penalty for those drivers would be a mere $50 each, with no license points. She could have pointed out that motorists killed at least five pedestrians in Staten Island in the last year, and noted that lower speeds save lives.

Instead, Farinacci threw in a couple of standard gripe on the street quotes from motorists who can’t imagine adhering to the new 25 miles per hour speed limit “when they’re used to driving a bit faster.” And she spoke with City Council Member Steve Matteo about the “notorious” speed camera on Goethals Road, where the posted speed is 30 mph — meaning drivers have to be traveling at least 41 mph to get a ticket. Said Matteo:

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NYPD Blames Teen Killed by SI Motorist Before Completing Investigation

A motorist waits to make a left turn from Hylan Boulevard onto Bayview Avenue, the same turn taken by the driver who struck and killed Jenna Daniels on Saturday afternoon. NYPD blamed Daniels for the collision. Image: Google Maps

A motorist waits to make a left turn from Hylan Boulevard onto Bayview Avenue, the same turn taken by the driver who struck and killed Jenna Daniels Saturday afternoon. NYPD blamed Daniels for the collision. Image: Google Maps

NYPD says it’s still investigating the death of a teenage jogger who was struck by a motorist on Staten Island, but that didn’t stop the department from publicizing a “preliminary” finding claiming the victim was at fault. Based on NYPD investigations into this crash and others, it’s open season on pedestrians who cross streets on a diagonal and don’t stay within the precise confines of a crosswalk.

The driver of a pickup truck hit 15-year-old Jenna Daniels as he made a left turn from Hylan Boulevard onto Bayview Avenue in Prince’s Bay at approximately 2:39 p.m. Saturday, according to the Staten Island Advance.

Police said Daniels was on Hylan, crossing Bayview from west to east, when she was hit. She suffered severe head trauma and was declared dead on arrival at Staten Island University Hospital, the Advance reported. A photo from the scene shows a black Ford F-150 with a raised chassis, oversized aftermarket wheels, a blacked-out grille and front bumper, and tinted headlights.

True to protocol, NYPD did not release the name of the 38-year-old motorist, who was not charged by police or Staten Island District Attorney Dan Donovan. NYPD ticketed the driver for tinted windows, the Advance said, though according to the Collision Investigation Squad report, “the windows did not contribute to the crash.”

The collision investigation squad’s report notes that his license and registration were valid, that he passed a Breathalyzer test and that he was not on his cell phone when he struck Ms. Daniels. His speed at the time of the collision was not recorded as part of the CIS report, police said.

While disclosing nothing about the driver’s speed — the single most important factor in the severity of a crash — NYPD said Daniels was jogging “outside the crosswalk … with headphones in her ears,” according to the Advance. NYPD said the motorist “had the right of way,” a claim refuted by attorney Steve Vaccaro, who said city traffic rules permit mid-block crossings on Bayview Avenue, which has several unsignalized intersections.

“On most every block in Manhattan, you have to cross at a crosswalk,” Vaccaro told the Advance. “That is not true on a block like this where there is not a traffic signal at both ends.”

Daniels appears to have been just barely outside the crosswalk when she was struck. If Daniels was jogging west to east on Hylan, as police say, she may have been headed for a desire path on the east side of Bayview (out of frame to the left in the above Google Maps image), which leads to an apartment complex and is a short diagonal from the northwest corner of the Hylan intersection. Photos published by the Advance indicate that a makeshift memorial was installed for Daniels near the spot where the desire path begins.

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No Homicide Charge for Unlicensed Curb-Jumping Driver Who Killed SI Woman

A motorist who crashed on a Staten Island sidewalk was charged by District Attorney Dan Donovan with driving without a license and drug possession, but not for killing one pedestrian and hospitalizing another.

Christal Aliotta. Photo via Staten Island Advance

Christal Aliotta. Photo via SI Advance

On the afternoon of June 9, a motorist jumped the curb and hit 31-year-old Christal Aliotta and her 20-year-old cousin Stephanie Canecchio as they walked along Hylan Boulevard at Cleveland Avenue in Great Kills. Aliotta, the mother of two young daughters, died at the scene. She was struck after reportedly pushing her cousin out of the driver’s path.

Police arrested Michael Fox, 23, who according to a criminal court complaint was found at the scene inside a 2005 Honda Accord with the engine running. The complaint says officers discovered a “hypodermic syringe, spoon with residue and tourniquet band” in the car, and found “two glassines containing heroin residue” in Fox’s pockets. Fox’s license had been suspended on May 23 for failure to answer a traffic summons, according to the complaint and the Staten Island Advance.

Fox was charged with possession of a controlled substance and third degree aggravated unlicensed operation, both misdemeanors. He was not charged with homicide or assault for killing Aliotta and injuring Canecchio. The criminal court complaint and arrest report only mention the victims in passing.

A spokesperson for Donovan’s office told Streetsblog prosecutors have Fox’s toxicology report, but declined to say what the results were. “[W]e are still reviewing them as the case is ongoing,” the spokesperson said via email.

On the day of her daughter’s wake, Lisa Canecchio said she wants Donovan to upgrade charges against Fox. From the Advance:

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Sidewalk-Jumping Driver Kills One Pedestrian, Injures Another in Great Kills

Photos from the scene of a Monday afternoon crash show a Honda on the sidewalk on the northeast corner of Hylan Boulevard and Cleveland Avenue. Image: Google Maps

The northwest corner of Hylan Boulevard and Cleveland Avenue. Image: Google Maps

Update: The victim who died in this crash was identified as Christal Aliotta, 31. As of Tuesday the driver, 23-year-old Michael Fox, was charged with aggravated unlicensed operation and drug possession, according to the Advance.

Police say charges are pending after a curb-jumping driver killed one pedestrian and injured another in Staten Island this afternoon.

At around 1:44 p.m. a motorist drove onto the sidewalk at Hylan Boulevard and Cleveland Avenue in Great Kills, striking two women, according to the Staten Island Advance. An FDNY spokesperson said two people were transported but did not have information on their conditions. The Advance reported that, according to NYPD, one victim died at the scene, and the other was hospitalized in stable condition.

A photo published by the Advance shows a tan Honda sedan with extensive front end damage on a sidewalk surrounded by police tape. “Several personal items, including a bag and shoes, were strewn about the sidewalk nearby,” the Advance reported.

NYPD told Streetsblog charges against the driver were forthcoming. Police had not released the names of anyone involved in the crash as of this writing.

New York City motorists have fatally struck at least 17 pedestrians on sidewalks, in open fields, and in places of business since January 2013, according to crash data compiled by Streetsblog.

This fatal crash occurred in the 122nd Precinct. To voice your concerns about neighborhood traffic safety directly to Captain Robert Bocchino, the commanding officer, go to the next precinct community council meeting. The 122nd Precinct council meetings happen at 8 p.m. on the third Wednesday of the month at the precinct, 2320 Hylan Blvd. Call 718-667-2292 for information.

The City Council district where this fatal crash occurred is represented by Vincent Ignizio, one of the council’s most outspoken street safety critics. To encourage Ignizio to take action to improve street safety in his district and citywide, contact him at 212-788-7390, vignizio@council.nyc.gov, or @VincentIgnizio.

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Senior Critically Injured by Driver on Hylan Boulevard Last Night

A 79-year-old man was critically injured by a motorist in Staten Island last night, on a day when three pedestrians were killed by New York City drivers.

A witness to last night's crash said she narrowly escaped injury. NYPD had no information on whether the driver was charged or summonsed. Photo: Advance

A witness to last night’s crash said she narrowly escaped injury. NYPD had no information on whether the driver was charged or summonsed. Photo: Advance

The victim was crossing Hylan Boulevard at Bay Street when he was struck by the driver of a 2012 Acura, who was northbound on Hylan, according to NYPD and the Staten Island Advance. Contrary to tweets indicating that the victim died, as of this morning the NYPD public information office said he was transported to Staten Island University Hospital in critical condition. His name has not been released.

NYPD had no information on summonses or charges. Also unknown is whether speed was a factor in the crash, or who had the right of way.

A witness told the Advance she was nearly hit as well:

The accident happened just before 10 p.m. in Rosebank, according to a fellow pedestrian who said she’d been crossing also and came within a few feet of being struck herself.

“I’m trying not to think of that right now,” she said, declining to give her name. “It was scary. I just want to go home.”

The witness, from New Dorp, said the victim, not yet identified, was responsive when EMTs loaded him into their ambulance.

She described the driver as an “elderly woman” who was visibly “shaken up” by the accident.

Last night’s crash happened hours after three New Yorkers were killed by motorists in Queens and Manhattan. The victims included Olga Rivera, who was struck in East Harlem on her 65th birthday. At least 30 pedestrians and cyclists age 65 or older have been killed by New York City drivers in 2013.

This injury crash occurred in the 120th Precinct. To voice your concerns about neighborhood traffic safety directly to Deputy Inspector John Sprague, the commanding officer, go to the next precinct community council meeting. The next 120th Precinct council meeting is scheduled for November 20 at Mt. Sinai Skills and Development Center, 382 Jersey Street. Call 718-876-8505 for information.

The City Council district where this crash occurred is represented by Deborah Rose. To encourage Rose to take action to improve street safety in her district and citywide, contact her at 212-788-6972 or DROSE@Council.nyc.gov.

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At Molinaro’s Request, Streets Around S.I. Boro Hall Now More Ped-Friendly

Hyatt Street in St. George is set to receive a new pedestrian median (in dark gray) and new crosswalks with distinctive markings (in red). Image: DOT

Behind Staten Island Borough Hall in St. George is Hyatt Street. It spans all of two blocks, but there are few markings on the wide two-way street, making it a tricky spot for pedestrians crossing between offices, shops, a library, and the St. George Theater just uphill from the Staten Island Ferry landing.

After a request from Borough President James Molinaro spurred by the construction of  a new courthouse along Hyatt Street between Central Avenue and St. Mark’s Place, DOT has begun installing lane markings, patterned crosswalks, and a pedestrian median with street trees.

DOT presented the design to Community Board 1 on October 8 [PDF], began construction shortly afterward, and expects to complete the project in approximately one month.

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Reports: Drunk Off-Duty NYPD Officer Kills Pedestrian in Staten Island

Today's crash was reportedly the latest in a succession of off-duty NYPD drunk driving disasters. Photo: Daily News

A pedestrian was killed by an intoxicated off-duty NYPD officer in Staten Island this morning, according to reports.

The crash happened on Richmond Terrace near Simonson and Lake Avenues at around 6:15 a.m., when the male victim was hit by the driver of a Ford SUV. The Daily News says the man was crossing Simonson when he was struck.

NY1 reports that the 29-year-old driver is an officer with the 121st Precinct, where the crash occurred.

Sources say the victim landed on the car and the officer just kept driving.

He then allegedly fled the scene but returned about a half an hour later.

Officials tell NY1 the officer has been with the department since 2005 and finished his shift Thursday around 6 p.m.

The victim, whose age is being reported as 51 and 59, was taken to Richmond University Medical Center in cardiac arrest and died soon after, reports said.

WABC says the officer was charged with drunk driving.

The NYPD public information office had no details as of this writing.

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