Recent Streetsblog posts about DOT

STREETSBLOG NYC

DOT Has Closed the Queensboro Bridge Bike/Ped Path Overnight for 16 of the Past 24 Months

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The Queensboro Bridge bike/ped path has been closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. for 16 of the last 24 months while ConEdison conducts electrical repair work. Currently, a six-week closure that began on May 21 is making nighttime trips especially difficult for working cyclists. Despite the regularity of the closures, DOT still hasn't worked out a reasonable alternative for people who count on overnight access to the path.
bdb-nypd
STREETSBLOG NYC

There’s a Better Way to Assess the Effect of Traffic Enforcement Than Counting Tickets

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NYPD has increased tickets for speeding and texting while driving 50 percent so far in 2017 compared to the same period last year, Commissioner James O’Neill testified at a City Council budget hearing last week. Speeding and distracted driving are two of the most common factors in fatal and injurious crashes in NYC, so it stands to reason that this shift in enforcement is reducing the incidence of dangerous driving. But there's no way to actually tell if those summonses are changing driver behavior.
STREETSBLOG NYC

Crowded, Car-Choked Downtown Flushing Shouldn’t Be a Void in the Bike Network

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At a DOT forum to plan for better bicycling conditions in downtown Flushing, Council Member Peter Koo told the packed room he doesn't believe bike lanes belong in the area. Koo did not stick around for the rest of the meeting, but if he had, he would have heard a different story from his constituents, many of whom see biking as the only viable way to get to Flushing's dense downtown core.
STREETSBLOG NYC

There’s Got to Be More to the L Train Shutdown Plan Than What the MTA and DOT Have Shown So Far

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Starting in January 2019, service on the L train west of Bedford Avenue will be suspended for 15 months to allow for Sandy-related repairs. The only way to keep hundreds of thousands of people moving is to dedicate significant street space to buses on both sides of the East River. But at a presentation to elected officials on Friday, the MTA and DOT did not indicate that bus lanes are part of their plan, except on the Williamsburg Bridge itself.