Sneckdowns: The Early Years

All photos: Michael King

Madison Avenue, in the year 2000. All photos: Michael King

Before there were hashtags and #sneckdowns, there was Michael King, taking pictures of residual snow on NYC street corners. A principal with Nelson\Nygaard, King is an architect by training and a pioneer of traffic calming street design in the United States. He captured these images to show how much asphalt can easily be claimed to make streets safer.

King says he used these photos for his own research and to make the case for curb extensions at NYC DOT, where he was named the agency’s first director of traffic calming in 1997. The Brooklyn photos were taken in the mid- to late-90s, and King says they may have influenced the Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming Project (which was in the works for years but implemented quite recently). The Central Park and Upper East Side photos are from 2000.

Enjoy, and get ready for more sneckdowns coming soon: The forecast calls for six inches of snow starting Sunday evening.

central_park_snow

The 96th Street Central Park transverse.

central_park_no_snow

The same transverse, sneckdownless. Look at those wide lanes — so much room to speed.

congress_court

Court Street and Congress Street.

dean_hoyt

Hoyt and Dean.

amity_clinton

Clinton and Amity.