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Chris Quinn: “I Don’t Anticipate Congestion Pricing Coming Back Around”

Posted By Ben Fried On February 15, 2013 @ 12:59 pm In Christine Quinn,Congestion Pricing,Streetsblog | 4 Comments

Dana Rubinstein [1] reports that City Council speaker and current mayoral front-runner Christine Quinn is bearish on congestion pricing’s political prospects:

“I don’t anticipate congestion pricing coming back around,” City Council Speaker Christine Quinn told an audience at New York Law School today, when asked about its near-term future. “It didn’t do well and I don’t expect that proposal to come back around in that way.”

Is this disappointing? Sure, it would be great news for New York City if a mayoral candidate ran in support of the single most transformative traffic and transit policy out there [2]. And Quinn, who helped shepherd congestion pricing through the City Council in 2007 and 2008, is one of two contenders with a voting record in support of it. (The other is John Liu, who voted for congestion pricing when he was a City Council member representing Flushing, then turned around and opposed bridge tolls in 2009 [3], when he had a citywide campaign to worry about. Bill de Blasio, meanwhile, voted against congestion pricing but is on the record supporting East River bridge tolls [4] pegged to the subway fare.)

But is this significant? Well, I don’t think it means a whole lot.

Noted congestion pricing champion Michael Bloomberg, for instance, never campaigned on congestion pricing. He floated East River bridge tolls in 2002, a month after getting elected for the first time, but stopped pressing for them after then-governor George Pataki ruled out the idea [5]. Running for re-election in 2005, Bloomberg again didn’t make congestion pricing a campaign issue, but it turned out to be his single biggest policy initiative in 2007 and 2008. Democratic Governor Eliot Spitzer backed the idea [6], and if he wasn’t such a weak-willed dirtbag [7], who knows, he might have steamrolled congestion pricing through Albany.

So mayoral candidates aren’t going to campaign on road pricing, even if they believe in it, and in the end, the person who has the most power to make it happen is the governor. If the NYC region is going to get a rationally priced road network and a well-funded transit system, it’s up to Andrew Cuomo to get things started — from the looks of it, preferably sometime after the mayoral election.


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URL to article: http://www.streetsblog.org/2013/02/15/chris-quinn-i-dont-anticipate-congestion-pricing-coming-back-around/

URLs in this post:

[1] Dana Rubinstein: http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/politics/2013/02/7784800/christine-quinn-wont-touch-congestion-pricing-anymore

[2] the single most transformative traffic and transit policy out there: http://www.streetsblog.org/2013/02/15/lessons-from-london-after-10-years-of-the-congestion-charge/

[3] then turned around and opposed bridge tolls in 2009: http://www.streetsblog.org/2008/11/10/mta-stares-down-billion-dollar-deficit-as-liu-and-weiner-mock-bridge-tolls/

[4] supporting East River bridge tolls: http://www.streetsblog.org/2009/04/06/bill-de-blasio-comes-out-for-2-east-river-bridge-tolls/

[5] stopped pressing for them after then-governor George Pataki ruled out the idea: http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/11/how-east-river-bridges-have-stayed-toll-free/

[6] backed the idea: http://www.streetsblog.org/2007/06/07/spitzer-backs-congestion-pricing/

[7] a weak-willed dirtbag: http://www.streetsblog.org/2008/03/10/open-thread-spitzer-prostitution-scandal/

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